About your Search

20121108
20121116
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8
in the next four years? >> the economy might be recovering. if the recovery is not complete or if growth is tepid and slow and jobs do not come back by the time of the next presidential campaign, how will that affect the types of policies that candidates will propose? different solutions and how people might change electorally. >> i think given polling data and the uncertainty of it these days, i think there were a lot of reasonable predictions you could have made from getting barack obama to 332 would have been a reasonable prediction. getting over 304 mitt romney was within the realm of possibilities, or a reasonable person could conclude. there are lots of issues in polling now that carolina has been following closely better generally troubling to a lot of pollsters. polling procedures are developed in a nation that had landline telephones and a population that answer the phone. we do not live in such a nation anymore. peter researchers found 9% of calls resulted in a complete interview. in 1997 was 37%. is the representative of the larger public, we are not sure. the exit poll intake
their ideas as well. in a time when our economy is still recovering from the great recession, our top priority has to be jobs and growth. that is the focus of the plan that i talked about during the campaign. [applause] it is a plan to reward small businesses and manufacturers to create jobs here, not overseas, a plan to give people the chance to get the education and training that businesses are looking for right now. it is a plan to make sure this country is a global leader in research and technology and clean energy, which will attract new companies and high- wage jobs for america. it is a plan put americans back to work, including veterans, rebuilding our infrastructure, and it is a plan to reduce our deficit in a balanced and responsible way. our work is made that much more urgent because at the end of this year we face a series of deadlines that require us to make major decisions about how to pay our deficit down, decisions that will have a huge impact on economies and the middle class, both now and in the future. last year i worked with democrats and republicans to cut $1 trillion in sp
lines for these tax cuts that would cause damage to the economy if they're not dealt with. extending those tax cuts for 98% of the american people would deal with more than half in dollar terms of the impact caused by the fiscal cliff. there are other challenges we need to address including the sequester but congress ought to, the house ought to pass those tax cuts right away because it would send a tremendous positive signal to the american people that in the wake of this election, we can at the very least, come together and convert into law a bill that everyone agrees should become law, republicans and democrats alike, the president included. and we will then continue to work on those issues where we have broader disagreement. and that's where the president has invited leaders of congress to the white house next week. that's why he will be meeting with business leaders and labor leaders and others to get their ideas about how to move forward. he does have his own very specific plan that reduces the deficit by $4 trillion, that does it in a balanced bay and we can invest in research
the only democratic candidate running on a record of a weak economy and debt crisis that we face and still win. yet, he did. they did very many things that were right. you can point to a couple of things with mitt romney. he may not have been the perfect candidate for 2012 given his corporate turnaround background, secondly, he did not get something republicans have counted on and that is the white working-class voters. in states like ohio, the ads attacking mayor romney as a corporate raider and buccaneer that went on for many months put on by the obama campaign seemed to work. the white working-class vote did not turn out for mitt romney in the numbers he needed. host: you had a piece yesterday, "the survivor in chief." you know to that they expose the myth of the enthusiastic democratic voter. guest: it was a myth i subscribe to for a while. i am sure you read about this over and over again. the democratic voters were dispirited and they were not feeling enthusiastic about the campaign. it was the conservatives and republicans fired up and getting ready to go. the notion was, he would h
. will these businesses be shut down? will it weaken the national security because of a weakening economy? these are tough questions. veterans need to know that the american it legion and our elected officials are working hard to resolve these issues confronting the nation they swore to protect and defend. these men and women have sacrificed in ways we are only beginning to understand. the families have and will, and it is truly a to us to ensure the sacrifices are rewarded with the promise of a brighter future. that a brighter future we all know, depends on the ability to earn a decent living. in my written testimony you will find jobs among the american legion's list of priorities. a stronger economy and specifically improve career prospects for veterans will go a long way towards solving a number of problems facing our nation today. it is no secret that a larger percentage of america's veterans are struggling to find work, having faced jobless rates as much as 2/3 higher than in the comparable civilian population in the past year. the american legion has been to the forefront of efforts to combat veter
there. it's brutal out there. and by "there" i mean, here. right here in america. economy is still in rough shape, and that slashing sound you hear is a big pair of scissors bearing down on the federal budget. safety aid cuts and all this coming if we drive over this fiscal cliff, so-called. and cuts, they hurt. somebody bleeds. the aid cut alone would mean that nearly 275,000 people won't get aids treatment they need resulting in yet over 60,000 deaths. $250,000 more children become aids orphans. real people. real bleeding. so that's why the you hear us on the one count saying cuts shouldn't cost lives. it can cost the lives of the poorest of the poor. it shouldn't be a hard case to make, but it is right now in the halls of congress, senate. maybe even here in healy hall. but i put it to you, we must not let this economic recession become a moral recession. that would be double cruelty. [applause] you know, it doesn't just take away your chances here at home, this recession. but it might take away your generation's shot at greatness in the wider world. the generation before you ou
about where this economy is. some people have argued we are just in the cycle and it will come all back. there are a lot of us you think we're in a different place in our history, in this economy, and we have to take much more seriously the allocation of our resources and the impact of that tax code on investment and consumption in this country if we are going to have a piper the economy. that argument -- a vibrant economy. that would lead you to begin to this is much more serious about tax reform. let me add just to make the thing harbor, i think chris carter, dick is right, you will not just rate reductions as a way to pay for it. what you might look for is another stream of income, and one theory that is under discussion in some circles, we get a lot of analysis, the carbon tax, which does not have a prayer in hell kind of proposition. if we enabled factions in the congress to get other things they want as important, it might be that he could start something modestly that grows over time and in a sense kill two birds with constant. somebody might get killed in the process. >> that is
facing lbgt people. and i said, i don't know, the economy or jobs -- jobs and health care. and they were like, you know, what are the lbgt issues? you know, these are the issues. we actually cut across every demographic status and that means that in many ways, every issue that is facing other people in society are the very issues that we are facing, too. the ones that have been the big issues, maybe a little bit more unique to some of the specific issues. but they are not the only ones. if we can make ourselves visible, obviously it is not inclusive of the entire community. he beat out a whole swath of this. how many people are married? even in the broader general society versus people who aren't married. that is even a smaller number for same-sex couples. we have a lot of work to do and a lot of discrimination of people continue to face. >> i wanted to talk about thinking about the future of marriage equality. however it goes forward through the states. there is very much a way that that could be mobilized for an aggressive agenda. i wondered if he wanted to make any connections between
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)